Why Teens Are Impulsive, Addiction-Prone And Should Protect Their Brains

Research into how the human brain develops helps explain why teens have trouble controlling impulses.

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Neurofeedback technique can ‘reboot’ brain for ADHD, PTSD sufferers

electrodesIn September 2013, Chris Gardner went from kicking and spinning as a black belt in taekwondo to being locked in a world where he could not follow conversations — or even walk his dog. The 58-year-old Vienna, Va., resident had just had brain surgery to remove a large tumour, and the operation affected his mobility and cognition.

After nine months of physical and occupational therapy, he’d made little progress. So he tried neurofeedback, hoping this controversial treatment would improve his balance and mental processes.
Neurofeedback — a type of biofeedback — uses movies, video games, computers and other tools to help individuals regulate their brain waves. A patient might watch a movie, for example, while hooked to sensors that send data to a computer. A therapist, following the brain activity on a monitor, programs the computer to stop the movie if an abnormal number of fast or slow brain waves is detected or if the brain waves are erratic, moving rapidly from fast to slow waves.

The stop-and-start feedback, repeated over and over in numerous sessions, seems to yield more-normal brain waves. Researchers who endorse the technique say they don’t know exactly how it works but they say the changes in brain waves result in improved ability to focus and relax.  Read the complete article by clicking here

About the Author – ARLENE KARIDIS, THE WASHINGTON POST

http://www.nfcenters,com

There’s a Suicide Epidemic in Utah — And One Neuroscientist Thinks He Knows Why

Welcome To Utah SignLiving in Utah means packed powder in April, canyoneering in the clouds, snow-capped vistas so vivid they look Photoshopped — and the shortest average work week in the country. So it’s not surprising that surveys show how much Utah residents love their outdoorsy, adventure-filled state.

But there’s another side to Utah that isn’t shown in surveys. Despite ranking as America’s happiest state, Utah has disproportionately high rates of suicide and associated mood disorders compared to the rest of the country. In fact, it’s the No. 1 state for antidepressant use. These polarized feelings of despondency and delight underlie a confusing phenomenon that Perry Renshaw, a neuroscientist at the University of Utah investigating the strange juxtaposition, calls the “Utah paradox.”

Utah residents and experts are aware of the paradox, often attributing gun use, low population density and the area’s heavy Mormon influence as potential factors. But Renshaw thinks he’s identified a more likely cause for the Utah blues: altitude.

Renshaw believes that altitude has an impact on our brain chemistry, specifically that it changes the levels of serotonin and dopamine, two key chemicals in the brain that help regulate our feelings of happiness. America’s favorite antidepressants (and party drugs) work by controlling the level of these chemicals in the brain. The air in Utah, one could say, works just like this.

Since moving to Utah in 2008, Renshaw has found mounting statistical, scientific and anecdotal support for his theory. If Renshaw’s theory holds true, his work represents a major step forward in solving a long-standing mental health mystery.

Read the full article here:

http://mic.com/articles/104096/there-s-a-suicide-epidemic-in-utah-and-one-neuroscientist-thinks-he-knows-why

To learn how Neurofeedback Therapy treats Depression without drugs or surgery click here:

http://www.nfcenters.com

Cats, Astronauts and Orange Robes… The Unlikely History of Neurofeedback

Neurofeedback began in the late 1950’s through the work of Dr Joe Kamiya at the University of Chicago.  He discovered that he could train cats to control their epileptic seizures through a simple brain feedback device. Happily, he moved on to train humans to control their epilepsy using the same method.

In the 1960’s, the technique caught the attention of NASA scientists, who used it in astronaut training – initially to train out the likelihood of astronauts having seizures when exposed to lander fuel, and later for focus and attention training. They still use it in their space training programs today.

In the mid 1970’s, neurofeedback caught the attention of meditators as an aid in spiritual development, and so wandered into the no-man’s land between science and religion. Conferences were attended by two people in orange robes for each one in a white lab coat. Soon neurofeedback gained a certain reputation as a meditation or spiritual tool, which considering the extreme biases of the time made it an unpopular choice for career minded researchers.

Neurofeedback didn’t fit the (now defunct) medical view of how the brain functioned. Though the empirical data proved that neurofeedback worked, it couldn’t possibly work under the medical model. This kept neurofeedback regarded as ‘spooky’ medicine.

On the fringes work continued. By the late 80’s neurofeedback was being applied to attention deficit disorders, and through the 90’s to a wide variety of psychological and central nervous system based conditions.

Over the last decade, the medical view of the brain has changed completely and the principles of neuroplasticity are universally accepted. Neuroscience has come to accept the interrelation between the central nervous system, the autoimmune system, emotional, physical, and mental health. It has conceded that indeed, the brain can change at any age, and that we create new neurones throughout life. The natural mechanisms underlying neurofeedback are now becoming clear.

To most medical practitioners, neurofeedback is still foreign. Many hold a view based on its old reputation, and have had no exposure to the vast research available concerning neurofeedback. Old views die hard, particularly regarding competing methods that lie outside of their expertise.

About the Author:  BrainWorks Neurotherapy is located in London, UK.  http://www.brainworksneurotherapy.com

What’s in a Name? How Neurofeedback works.

questionEvery day I receive calls from people asking, “Does Neurofeedback treat this?  Does Neurofeedback treat that?”  The conditions range from Adult ADD to Anxiety to Depression and everything in between.  What Neurofeedback is effective in treating is much easier to understand once we drop the “labels” for specific conditions.  Neurofeedback is used to address symtpoms associated with Brain Wave Dysregulation Syndrome (BDS.)  BDS occurs when Brain Wave levels depart from accepted normal magnitudes, be it high or low.  When this occurs, specific symptoms are manifested.  For example:

A) Higher than normal magnitudes of Alpha Wave activity may produce symptoms associated with Fibromyalgia such as pain, irritability or depression.

B) Higher than normal magnitudes of Beta Wave activity may produce symptoms associated with generalized anxiety, panic attacks, migraine/tension headaches, chronic pain or insomnia.

C) With higher than normal magnitudes of Theta or Delta Waves, the person will likely experience attention and focus issues such as those associated with ADHD, cognitive decline, learning disorders, or symptoms related to concussion.

These are just a few examples of Brain Wave Dysregulation Syndrome.  So, the more appropriate question when calling would be, “Do the symptoms associated with depression (or any other condition) fit the known pattern of any form of Brain Wave Dysregulation?”

To learn more about Neurofeedback and its role in combatting BDS, visit our website at:

http://www.nfcenters.com

About the author: Greg Warden is the Executive Director of Neurofeedback Centers of Utah.