Why French Kids Don’t Have ADHD.

In the United States, at least 9 percent of school-aged children have been diagnosed with ADHD, and are taking pharmaceutical medications. In France, the percentage of kids diagnosed and medicated for ADHD is less than .5 percent. How has the epidemic of ADHD—firmly established in the U.S.—almost completely passed over children in France?

Featured imageIs ADHD a biological-neurological disorder? Surprisingly, the answer to this question depends on whether you live in France or in the U.S. In the United States, child psychiatrists consider ADHD to be a biological disorder with biological causes. The preferred treatment is also biological—psycho stimulant medications such as Ritalin andAdderall.

French child psychiatrists, on the other hand, view ADHD as a medical condition that has psycho-social and situational causes. Instead of treating children’s focusing and behavioral problems with drugs, French doctors prefer to look for the underlying issue that is causing the child distress—not in the child’s brain but in the child’s social context. They then choose to treat the underlying social context problem with psychotherapy or family counseling. This is a very different way of seeing things from the American tendency to attribute all symptoms to a biological dysfunction such as a chemical imbalance in the child’s brain.

To read the full article click here

About the Author:  published by Dr. Marilyn Wedge Ph.D. on Mar 08, 2012 in Suffer the Children

http://www.nfcenters.com

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Neurofeedback technique can ‘reboot’ brain for ADHD, PTSD sufferers

electrodesIn September 2013, Chris Gardner went from kicking and spinning as a black belt in taekwondo to being locked in a world where he could not follow conversations — or even walk his dog. The 58-year-old Vienna, Va., resident had just had brain surgery to remove a large tumour, and the operation affected his mobility and cognition.

After nine months of physical and occupational therapy, he’d made little progress. So he tried neurofeedback, hoping this controversial treatment would improve his balance and mental processes.
Neurofeedback — a type of biofeedback — uses movies, video games, computers and other tools to help individuals regulate their brain waves. A patient might watch a movie, for example, while hooked to sensors that send data to a computer. A therapist, following the brain activity on a monitor, programs the computer to stop the movie if an abnormal number of fast or slow brain waves is detected or if the brain waves are erratic, moving rapidly from fast to slow waves.

The stop-and-start feedback, repeated over and over in numerous sessions, seems to yield more-normal brain waves. Researchers who endorse the technique say they don’t know exactly how it works but they say the changes in brain waves result in improved ability to focus and relax.  Read the complete article by clicking here

About the Author – ARLENE KARIDIS, THE WASHINGTON POST

http://www.nfcenters,com

Cats, Astronauts and Orange Robes… The Unlikely History of Neurofeedback

Neurofeedback began in the late 1950’s through the work of Dr Joe Kamiya at the University of Chicago.  He discovered that he could train cats to control their epileptic seizures through a simple brain feedback device. Happily, he moved on to train humans to control their epilepsy using the same method.

In the 1960’s, the technique caught the attention of NASA scientists, who used it in astronaut training – initially to train out the likelihood of astronauts having seizures when exposed to lander fuel, and later for focus and attention training. They still use it in their space training programs today.

In the mid 1970’s, neurofeedback caught the attention of meditators as an aid in spiritual development, and so wandered into the no-man’s land between science and religion. Conferences were attended by two people in orange robes for each one in a white lab coat. Soon neurofeedback gained a certain reputation as a meditation or spiritual tool, which considering the extreme biases of the time made it an unpopular choice for career minded researchers.

Neurofeedback didn’t fit the (now defunct) medical view of how the brain functioned. Though the empirical data proved that neurofeedback worked, it couldn’t possibly work under the medical model. This kept neurofeedback regarded as ‘spooky’ medicine.

On the fringes work continued. By the late 80’s neurofeedback was being applied to attention deficit disorders, and through the 90’s to a wide variety of psychological and central nervous system based conditions.

Over the last decade, the medical view of the brain has changed completely and the principles of neuroplasticity are universally accepted. Neuroscience has come to accept the interrelation between the central nervous system, the autoimmune system, emotional, physical, and mental health. It has conceded that indeed, the brain can change at any age, and that we create new neurones throughout life. The natural mechanisms underlying neurofeedback are now becoming clear.

To most medical practitioners, neurofeedback is still foreign. Many hold a view based on its old reputation, and have had no exposure to the vast research available concerning neurofeedback. Old views die hard, particularly regarding competing methods that lie outside of their expertise.

About the Author:  BrainWorks Neurotherapy is located in London, UK.  http://www.brainworksneurotherapy.com

What’s in a Name? How Neurofeedback works.

questionEvery day I receive calls from people asking, “Does Neurofeedback treat this?  Does Neurofeedback treat that?”  The conditions range from Adult ADD to Anxiety to Depression and everything in between.  What Neurofeedback is effective in treating is much easier to understand once we drop the “labels” for specific conditions.  Neurofeedback is used to address symtpoms associated with Brain Wave Dysregulation Syndrome (BDS.)  BDS occurs when Brain Wave levels depart from accepted normal magnitudes, be it high or low.  When this occurs, specific symptoms are manifested.  For example:

A) Higher than normal magnitudes of Alpha Wave activity may produce symptoms associated with Fibromyalgia such as pain, irritability or depression.

B) Higher than normal magnitudes of Beta Wave activity may produce symptoms associated with generalized anxiety, panic attacks, migraine/tension headaches, chronic pain or insomnia.

C) With higher than normal magnitudes of Theta or Delta Waves, the person will likely experience attention and focus issues such as those associated with ADHD, cognitive decline, learning disorders, or symptoms related to concussion.

These are just a few examples of Brain Wave Dysregulation Syndrome.  So, the more appropriate question when calling would be, “Do the symptoms associated with depression (or any other condition) fit the known pattern of any form of Brain Wave Dysregulation?”

To learn more about Neurofeedback and its role in combatting BDS, visit our website at:

http://www.nfcenters.com

About the author: Greg Warden is the Executive Director of Neurofeedback Centers of Utah.

 

Neurofeedback… a report from the front lines

If someone were to tell you there was a simple method to reduce or eliminate symptoms Neurofeedback, ADHD, Anxiety, Addiction, PTSD, St. George, Utahassociated with neurological conditions, increase the prospects of permanent recovery from Addiction five fold, make students smarter, athletes better, artists more creative and business people more productive… well, your BS meter would probably peg in the red and rightfully so.  What’s the old saying?  If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  In the case of Neurofeedback, the key word here is PROBABLY.  But seeing is believing.  Every day I see people come to our center for treatment.  Individuals suffering from Depression, ADHD, Addiction, Chronic Pain, Insomnia and more.  What I have witnessed has validated the more than 600 studies that sit on my desk espousing the efficacy of Neurofeedback.  Here’s a report from the front lines:

1) ADHD sufferers incapable of sitting still for more than 10 or 15 minutes for treatment, easily sitting for 50 minutes to an hour after only 6 sessions.  For one patient we have requested a reevaluation and possible reduction in medication by their attending physician.

2) Depression sufferers, after only 4 sessions claiming they feel GOOD!

3) Insomnia sufferer, sleeping but 2 hours per night, experienced a full 10 1/2 hours of sleep after the 3rd session and has continued to enjoy a full 6 hours or more of rest on a consistent basis.

4) Light sleepers claiming they are getting the sleep of their lives after only 4 treatments for a completely unrelated condition.

Because the average number of sessions required for a complete Neurofeedback treatment is usually in the range of 10-20, it is exciting to see tangible results so early.  To get the latest in Neurofeedback research, patient progress and advanced notice of our individual workshops, follow our blog, Facebook, Google Plus or Twitter.

About the Author, Greg Warden is the Executive Director of Neurofeedback Centers of Utah in St. George.

Visit our website for more information: http://www.nfcenters.com

Psychiatric Times – EEG Neurofeedback for Treating Psychiatric Disorders

Neurofeedback, also called electroencephalogram (EEG) biofeedback or neurotherapy, is an adjunctive treatment used for psychiatric conditions such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, phobic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, depression and affective disorders, autism, and addictive disorders (Moore, 2000; Rosenfeld, 2000; Trudeau, 2000).

In an interview with Psychiatric Times, Siegfried Othmer, Ph.D., chief scientist at EEG Spectrum International Inc., described neurofeedback as neuroregulation in the time and frequency domains through the use of bioelectrical operant conditioning. Like repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), neurofeedback is an innovative form of electrotherapeutics that complements neurochemical interventions for mood disorders. “With the use of anticonvulsants as mood stabilizers,” Othmer said, “we have seen a convergence of psychiatry and neurology in the field of pharmacology. Similarly, neurofeedback signals a convergence of psychiatry and neurology in bioelectrical approaches to treating affective disorders. By stabilizing the brain and rewarding it for holding particular states, neurofeedback acts as a natural anticonvulsant.” The rationale for using neurofeedback therapeutically is that it corrects deficits in brain cerebral regulatory function related to arousal, attention, vigilance and affect (Othmer et al., 1999).

– See more at: http://www.psychiatrictimes.com/articles/eeg-neurofeedback-treating-psychiatric-disorders-0?verify=0#sthash.ndl9IkwJ.dpuf

 

or visit our website at http://www.neurologicaldisordersutah.com

Neurofeedback: the most studied, effective and simple treatment for ADD/ADHD that you’ve never heard of.

People diagnosed with ADD/ADHD are traditionally prescribed medication to control the symptoms of the disorder.  This medication is a temporary method of returning dysregulated brain wave activity to normal.  Unfortunately, once the medication has run its course, the symptoms return with a vengence.  However, there is an alternative, a drug free, painless and non-invasive procedure named by the American Academy of Pediatricians as a “Level One Best Treatment” for ADD/ADHD… Neurofeedback.  Neurofeedback Treatments make it possible for 80% of its recipients to dramatically lower or even eliminate the need for medication and the effects are permanent.  To learn more about Neurofeedback Therapy and how it works, visit our website at:

http://www.neurologicaldisordersutah.com